FoodReference.com Logo

Recommended Books Section

FoodReference.com
Cookbooks; Culinary Biographies & Memoirs; Food History, Science & References

Home       Food Articles       Food Trivia & Facts       Today in Food History       Recipes       Cooking Tips       Food Videos       Food Quotes       Who's Who       Food Trivia Quizzes       Crosswords       Food Poems       Cookbooks       Food Posters       Recipe Contests       Culinary Schools       Gourmet Tours       Food Festivals

 You are here > Home

COOKBOOKSFood Science Books >  Science of Good Food

 

CULINARY SCHOOLS
& COOKING CLASSES

From Amateur & Basic Cooking Classes to Professional Chef Training
Over 1,000 schools & classes listed for all 50 States, Online & Worldwide

 

FREE Food & Beverage Publications
An extensive selection of free magazines for Food & Beverage professionals. Subjects include food arts, beverages, restaurants, seafood, dairy foods, meats, food processing, hospitality, hotels, etc.

Chef with red wine glass

 

The Science of Good Food: The Ultimate Reference on How Cooking Works
by David Joachim, Andrew Schloss

Description
'The Science Of Good Food' is the first A to Z reference book to bring the science of food to home cooks and professionals alike. This highly readable book contains more than 1,600 entries, arranged alphabetically and cross-referenced, that touch on a variety of scientific disciplines from biology and chemistry to agriculture and nutrition. In addition to practical and scientific information, 'The Science Of Good Food' includes more than 100 recipes.

While demystifying the complexities of cooking, the book sheds a welcome light on the confounding phenomena of everyday eating such as why artichokes make certain foods taste sweeter and what causes some people to think cilantro tastes like soap. Topics on cooking ingredients discuss the basic molecular make-up of meats, poultry, game, fish, shellfish, vegetables, fruits, cheese, eggs, dough, and most other foodstuffs, as well as how these foods react to heat, helping you cook better.

The book even includes chemistry principles that unravel the physical and chemical transformations that take place during everyday cooking, explaining things like aeration, caramelization, and gelatinization. Scores of charts, tables, and graphs, and more than 200 photographs and illustrations help you visualize the basic principles of food science.

Entries are broken into three sections called 'What It is', 'What It Does', and 'How It Works'. The first section defines the item and may include a bit of historical or other interesting information. The second section discusses the item's significance in food preparation and cooking and offers practical kitchen tips. The third section explains the science behind the item, including flavor chemistry and chemical transformations that occur during cooking. More practical tips are included in ‘Kitchen Wisdom’ boxes, while more detailed science information appears in ‘Science Wise’ boxes. Interesting food trivia is included in a ‘Fast Facts section’.

About The Authors
David Joachim has written, edited or collaborated on more than 30 cookbooks. His book The Food Substitutions Bible was an IACP award winner and his A Man, A Can series has sold more than 1 million copies. Other recent books include the New York Times bestselling Mastering the Grill (with Andrew Schloss). David lives near Philadelphia.

Andrew Schloss is a writer, teacher and food industry professional. The author of 11 cookbooks and countless food articles, he is also past president of the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP). His other recent books include Mastering the Grill (with David Joachim) and the Art of the Slow Cooker. Andrew lives in Philadelphia.

A. Philip Handel, Ph.D. directs the Hospitality Management, Culinary Arts, and Food Science program at Drexel University. He has been teaching food science for more than 30 years.

 

 You are here > Home

COOKBOOKSFood Science Books >  Science of Good Food
Copyright notice

 

 

 

Popular Pages