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See also: Article on Plums

PLUMS

Plums should be stored at 33 degrees F. at high (85%) humidity. They will keep 1 to 2 weeks maximum.

Plums are high in carbohydrates, low in fat and low in calories. Plums are free of sodium and cholesterol. Plums are a good source of vitamin C.

Plums stimulate the bowel movement. Its skin contains a substance that is responsible for that effect so if you peel the fruit you won't be bothered with the well-known side effects of this lovely fruit.
 

AVAILABILITY
 - The domestic plum season extends from May through October, with Japanese types coming on the market first and peaking in August, followed by European varieties in the fall.

SELECTION
 - Plums should be plump and well colored for their variety. Plums are usually about 3-6 cm in size. If a fruit yields to gentle pressure, it is ready to eat, however, you can buy plums that are fairly firm, but not rock hard and let them soften at home. They will not increase in sweetness. Ripe plums will be slightly soft at the stem and tip, but watch out for shriveled skin, mushy spots, or breaks in the skin.

STORAGE
 - To soften hard plums, place several in a loosely closed paper bag and leave them at room temperature for a day or two; when softened, transfer them to the refrigerator. Ripe plums can be refrigerated for up to three days.

Plums are juiciest at room temperature, but always wash them before eating or cooking. To pit freestone types, cut the fruit in half, twist the halves apart, and lift out the pit. To slice or quarter clingstone plums, use a sharp paring knife and cut through the flesh towards the pit.

European plums are better than Japanese varieties for cooking. Cooked plums are usually eaten with the skins on, but if you need to peel them, first blanch them in boiling water for about 30 seconds.
CDC.gov - 5 a Day


 

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