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FOOD TRIVIA & FACTSCABBAGE to CANTALOUPE >  Cajun & Cajun Cuisine

 

 

FOOD TRIVIA and FOOD FACTS

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CAJUN FOOD & CAJUN CUISINE TRIVIA

'Cajuns' are the descendants from the former French colony in East Canada, called Acadia (Nova Scotia), who were exiled by the English in 1755. Many made their way to Louisiana, settling in the swamps and bayous. Cajun cooking has very little influence of the classical cuisine of Europe - it is truly an American cuisine.     SEE ALSO: CREOLE

Cajun cuisine is simple, hearty fare, adapted to ingredients growing wild in Louisiana; bay leaves, file powder from Sassafras leaves, peppers, sweet potatoes, sugarcane, etc.  Fish, shellfish and wild game were abundant.

One pot meals, jambalaya, fricassees, gumbos, and soups are characteristic.  

Cajun cooks prefer a dark brown roux (originally made with animal fat, but now vegetable oil is used).  This dark flavorful roux adds richness and depth to Cajun dishes.
 

 

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