FoodReference.com Logo

Food Trivia & Food Facts Section

An eclectic collection of information about various foods and beverages,
plants and animals from around the world

Home       Food Articles       Food Trivia & Facts       Today In Food History       Recipes       Cooking Tips       Food Videos       Food Quotes       Who's Who       Food Trivia Quizzes       Crosswords       Food Poems       Cookbooks       Food Posters       Recipe Contests       Culinary Schools       Gourmet Tours       Food Festivals

You are here > Home > FOOD TRIVIA & FACTS

 

FOOD TRIVIA and FOOD FACTS

PINEAPPLE to PORT       Pineapples       Pineapple Upside Down C       Pink Beans       Pinto Beans       Pistachio Nuts       Pizza       Pizza Hut       Plantains       Planter's Nuts       Plastics & Food       Plastic Knives       Plum Pudding       Plums       Pluots       Poblano Peppers       Polar Bear       Polish Sausage       Pomegranate       Pomello       Pommes Souffles       Pond Lily       Pone       Pop       Popcorn       Popeye       Popover       Poppy Seeds       Pop Rocks       Popsicle       Population       Porcini Mushrooms       Pork       Pork & Beans       Pork Ribs       Porterhouse Steak       Portion Control       Portobello Mushrooms       Portuguese Cuisine

 

 

 

FOOD VIDEO SECTION
Recipe Videos, Food Safety,
Food Science, Food Festivals, Vintage Commercials, etc.

See also: PluotsArticle on Plums

PLUM TRIVIA

Plums on branch

Plum trees are grown on every continent except Antarctica.

There are more than 140 varieties of plum sold in the United States. The plum is a drupe—a pitted fruit—related to the nectarine, peach, and apricot, but it is far more diverse than its relatives, coming in a wider range of shapes, sizes and especially skin colors. Its flavors also vary from extremely sweet to quite tart. Some plum varieties are specifically bred so that they can be dried and still retain their sweetness, and these are used for prunes.
(The Wellness Encyclopedia of Food and Nutrition) CDC.gov - 5 a Day

There are 2,300 people in the U.S. listed on whitepages.com with the last name 'Plum'
(Mark Morton, 'Gastronomica', Fall 2010)

Plums

About twenty varieties dominate the commercial supply of plums and most are either Japanese or European varieties. Japanese are the nonprune plums or salicina plums. Originally from China, these plums were introduced into Japan more than 300 years ago. Most varieties have yellow or reddish flesh that is quite juicy and skin colors that range from crimson to black-red. They are also clingstone fruits—that is, their flesh clings to the pit. Plums are also used for their juice and often jam or a thick syrup is made out of it.

European-type plums are smaller, denser and less juicy than Japanese varieties; their skin color is always blue or purple and their pits are usually freestone, meaning they separate easily from the flesh. The flesh is a golden yellow color. These are the plums made into prunes; a few varieties are sold fresh and called fresh prunes or purple plums.  Damson plums are a small-tart European-type variety used mainly for preserves.
CDC.gov - 5 a Day

  • Plums can be divided into 2 distinctively different groups that are known as Japanese plums and European plums.
  • European varieties all have yellow to green/amber flesh and purple or blue skin.
  • Japanese plums come in a wide range of colors from gold to blood red, but never the blue/purple skin color.  Most also have yellow flesh, but some have red flesh.
  • The names of some of the red fleshed varieties you should look for are Frontier, Mariposa, Laroda, El Dorado, Carol Harris, Ace, Duarte and Elephant Heart.

Plums stimulate the bowel movement. Its skin contains a substance that is responsible for that effect so if you peel the fruit you won't be bothered with the well-known side effects of this lovely fruit.
CDC.gov - 5 a Day
 

 

Home       About Us & Contact Us       Food History Articles       Food Timeline       Catalogs       Other Links

Please feel free to link to any pages of FoodReference.com from your website.

For permission to use any of this content please E-mail: james@foodreference.com
All contents are copyright © 1990 - 2014 James T. Ehler and www.FoodReference.com unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved.

You may copy and use portions of this website for non-commercial, personal use only.
Any other use of these materials without prior written authorization is not very nice and violates the copyright.

Please take the time to request permission.

 

 

 

 

 

Also see: Food Articles  and Cooking Tips

 

Culinary Schools
& Cooking Classes

From Amateur & Basic Cooking Classes to Professional Chef Training - Over 1,000 schools & classes listed for all 50 States, Online & Worldwide