FoodReference.com
FOOD TRIVIA & FOOD FACTS SECTION

 

An eclectic collection of facts, trivia and statistics about various foods, beverages, plants and animals

You are here > Home

Also see: Food Articles and Cooking Tips

 

CULINARY SCHOOLS
& COOKING CLASSES

From Amateur & Basic Cooking Classes to Professional Chef Training & Degrees -  Associates, Bachelors & Masters - More than 1,000 schools & classes listed for all 50 States, Online and Worldwide

CHERRY TOMATOES

QUESTION: I was once told that the notched tine in the salad fork was to pierce a cherry tomato so that it did not explode when you put it in your mouth. is this correct?

ANSWER: In the late 19th century, refrigerated railroad cars made salad vegetables more abundant, and available for most of the year. The salad fork originally featured curved claw-shaped tines and was known as a 'lettuce fork.' To provide leverage when cutting thick veins of lettuce or broad vegetables served in salad, the salad fork is made with an extrawide left tine that is sometimes grooved. This is the 'notched tine' that you refer to in your email. It was not developed to prevent cherry tomatoes from exploding.
(For additional strength, the second and third tines of the salad fork are also occasionally connected by a rod.)

Some facts are from 'The Art of the Table'

 

 

 

FOOD TRIVIA and FOOD FACTS

  CHEF to CHILTEPIN   |   Chef Boyardee   |   Chefs   |   Chefs on TV   |   Chelsea Buns   |   Cherimoya   |  Cherries   |   Cherries Jubilee   |   Cherry Peppers   |   Cherry Tomatoes   |   Chervil   |   Cheshire Cheese  |   Chess Pie   |   Chestnuts   |   Chevre   |   Chewing   |   Chewing Gum   |   Chicago   |   Chicken   |   Chicken, Frozen?   |   Chicken Bog   |   Chicken Boy   |   Chicken Consumption   |   Chicken Divan   |   Chicken Feathers   |   Chicken Soup   |   Chicken Tetrazzini   |   Chick Pea   |   Chicory and Endive   |   Child, Julia   |   Chile (country)   |   Chile Peppers   |   Chili (Chili Con Carne)   |   Chili Powder   |   Chiltepin 
  Home   |   About Us & Contact Us   |   Bibliography   |   Food History Articles   |   Food Timeline   |   Free Magazines   |   Other Links  

Please feel free to link to any pages of FoodReference.com from your website.
For permission to use any of this content please E-mail: james@foodreference.com
All contents are copyright © 1990 - 2015 James T. Ehler and www.FoodReference.com unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved.
You may copy and use portions of this website for non-commercial, personal use only.
Any other use of these materials without prior written authorization is not very nice and violates the copyright.
Please take the time to request permission.


 

FoodReference.com Logo

 

 

FREE Magazines
and other Publications

An extensive selection of free magazines and other publications