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KALE

Kale

Kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) resembles 'wild' cabbage, and may be the ancestor to all of our modern common cabbage varieties.

Kale is a hardy and hearty green, and has been cultivated for over 2,000 years.

One cup of kale provides more than the daily requirement of vitamins A and C. It is also a good source of calcium and fiber.

Like other greens, kale descends from wild cabbage that originated in Asia Minor though it is known for it’s popularity in Scandinavia, Germany, Holland and Scotland. Kale was brought to the United States in the 17th century by English settlers. It is now a favorite in the southern United States where, like many cooking greens, it has been considered a poor man’s food.

   With long ruffled leaves that resemble large parsley sprigs and hues that vary from lavender to chartreuse, kale has a mild cabbage-like taste and delicate texture.

   Like most cooking greens, kale can grow in colder temperatures and withstand frost — which actually helps produce even sweeter leaves. Kale can also grow well in the hot weather in the southern United States and in poor soil. Kale is an excellent source of vitamin A, folic acid, and vitamin C and contains both protein and fiber.
 

 

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