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See also: Catsup Bottles (also see list of recipes below)

KETCHUP, CATSUP, CATCHUP

Some Recipes:
Anchovy Catchup (1851)
Cabbage Catsup (1904)
Catsup (1906)
Cucumber Catsups (1904)
Grape Catsup (1906)
Homemade Ketchup
Lobster Catchup (1851)
Mushroom Catsup (1904)
Oyster Catchup (1851)
Pontac Catsup (1845)
Sea Catchup (1851)
Tomato Ketchup (1801)
Tomato Catsups (1904)
Tomato Catsup (1906)
Walnut Ketchup (1841)
Walnut Catsup (1904)
 

The first record of the word in English was as 'catsup' in 1690; in 1711 the spelling 'ketchup' appeared, and finally in 1730 the spelling 'catsup' appeared.

In the 18th and 19th century, ketchup was a generic term used for various sauces whose only common ingredient was vinegar.

There is more to ketchup than just tomato ketchup. Some of the many varieties that have been popular include lobster, walnut, mushroom, cucumber, cranberry, oyster, lemon, grape, and anchovy.

Heinz ketchup was introduced in 1876 as a "Blessed relief for Mother and the other women in the household!"

Heinz sells more than 50% of the ketchup sold in the U.S.

Unopened bottles of ketchup can be stored for 1 year on a cool, dark, dry shelf.  Tightly covered opened bottles will last a month in a cool, dark, dry place.

Richard Nixon liked ketchup on his cottage cheese.
Tomato Catsup has a high acid content (due to both the tomatoes and vinegar in it) and therefore does not have to be refrigerated after opening. It is safe to store it at room temperature, but it will taste better if kept refrigerated.

Sales of Salsa overtook Ketchup sales in 1991 (in terms of dollar value).

 

 

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