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Vineyard

See also: Article on Grapes; Grape Tips; Wine; Grape Quotes

GRAPE FACTS & TRIVIA

grapes-150

In 2007 there were 1,051,407 acres devoted to growing grapes in the U.S. (USDA)

In a 2,000-year-old, 100-foot-deep well at the site of Cetamura del Chianti in Tuscany, Italy, archaeologists from Florida State University found 153 grape seeds. The pips date to the period shortly after the Romans claimed the site from the Etruscans. The researchers have identified the grapes as Vitis vinifera, or the wine grape. Because the seeds were not burned, they might carry preserved DNA that could offer insight into the beginnings of viticulture in the region now famous for its bold, fruity reds. “People are going to be interested in the variety of grapes we might be able to identify,” says archaeologist Nancy Thomson de Grummond.

(2013 Archaeology Magazine)

Missouri designated the Norton/Cynthiana Grape (Vitis aestivalis) as the Official State Grape in 2003.

The Oregon Grape (Berberis aquifolium) was designated as the Official Flower of Oregon in 1899.

About 10% of U.S. grapes are grown organically.

About 50% of the grapes grown in the U.S. are used to make wine.

The grape is one of the oldest fruits to be cultivated going back as far as biblical times. Spanish explorers introduced the fruit to America approximately 300 years ago. Some of the most popular ways in which the fruit is used, is eaten fresh, in preserves or canned in jellies, dried into raisins, and crushed for juice or wine. Although, machines have taken the place of much handwork, table grapes are still harvested by hand in many places.

(Wellness Encyclopedia of Food and Nutrition, 1992). CDC.gov - 5 a Day

The oldest cultivated grapevine in the country grows in North Carolina. The Mothervine in Manteo, Roanoke Island is a 400 year old Scuppernong vine. The Scuppernong or Muscadine grape is also the North Carolina state fruit.

Grape growing is the largest food industry in the world. There are more than 60 species and 8000 varieties of grapes, and they can all be used to make juice and/or wine.

The average person eats eight pounds of grapes a year.

The best selling grape in the U.S. is the Thompson Seedless. Golden raisins are also made from the Thompson seedless grape.

Botanically, grapes are berries. There are about 25 million acres of grapes worldwide.

The world production of grapes is over 72 million tons.

If white wine goes with fish, do white grapes go with sushi?

About 25% of the grapes eaten in the United States are imported from Chile.

California grows over 300,000 tons of grapes each year.

California has more then 500,000 acres of wine grapes. (2005)

It takes about 2 1/2 pounds of grapes to produce a bottle of wine.

One acre of grapes can produce an average of about 15,000 glasses of wine.

The most valuable fruit crops in the United States are in order, grapes, apples, oranges and strawberries.
(2000).
 

 

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