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Feeling blue? Eat a tuna sandwich!

 

With the holidays over, short days and temperatures dropping, it is common to feel a little “down” in the first few months of the year. Severe forms of this winter depression may suggest Seasonal Affective Disorder, which can be treated with medication. However, a mild decrease in mood and energy is extremely common this time of year, and can be improved through certain mood-enhancing foods.

Below, Ellie Krieger and the Just One More for Healthy Living Campaign offer some simple ways to improve your mood in these cold winter months.

Lifting your spirits is just a matter of eating the right mood food!

  • Tuna is loaded with good-mood inducing Omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Keep your pantry and desk stocked with StarKist Tuna Pouches. Simply add tuna to a salad or to a whole-wheat cracker for a healthy mood-boosting snack.
     
  • Cut down on the caffeine. Although it can provide an initial boost in energy and concentration, too much caffeine is linked to depression, anxiety and mood swings.
     
  • Spinach is an excellent source of Vitamin C and folate – both of which are mood-boosting nutrients that helps make serotonin.
         Del Monte Organic Baby Leaf Spinach is great to keep in the pantry. Serve as a side or add it into dishes like omelets and quiches.
     
  • Poultry such as turkey and chicken are excellent mood enhancers. They release the amino acid, tryptophan, which is converted into serotonin.
         A turkey sandwich is a great way to get tryptophan, however this amino acid can also cause fatigue. Therefore, it’s best to stick to a tuna sandwich for lunch and have turkey in the evening, closer to bedtime.
     
  • Eat small meals or snacks every few hours to avoid peaks and valleys in blood sugar levels. This will result in positive energy levels and a stable mood throughout the day.
     
  • Exercise also increases serotonin levels, so try to add in 30 extra minutes of activity a day.
     
  • Take the Just One More for Healthy Living pledge. The www.EatJustOneMore.com website offers valuable tips and recipes that will help you eat healthier this winter, resulting in improved mood.
     

 

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