FoodReference.com Logo

FoodReference.com   (Since 1999)
 

Food Articles, News & Features Section

Home      Food Articles      Food Trivia      Today in Food History      Recipes      Cooking Tips      Videos      Food Quotes      Who's Who      Food Trivia Quizzes      Crosswords      Food Poems      Cookbooks      Food Posters      Recipe Contests      Culinary Schools      Gourmet Tours      Food Festivals & Shows

 You are here > Home > Food Articles

 

CULINARY SCHOOLS &
COOKING CLASSES

From Amateur & Basic Cooking Classes to Professional Chef Training
Over 1,000 schools & classes listed for U.S., Online & Worldwide

Culinary Posters and Food Art

RADISH (Vegetables)

 

See also: Radish Trivia; Radish Tips; Radish Quotes

Radishes were first cultivated thousands of years ago in China, then in Egypt and Greece. Radishes were so highly regarded in Greece that gold replicas were made. The radish did not make its way to England until approximately 1548. By 1629 they were being cultivated in Massachusetts.

Radishes are root vegetables that resemble beets or turnips in appearance and texture, but have a distinct flavor. It is the root of a plant classified in the mustard family.

In the United States radishes are usually eaten raw; however, they can be added to cooked dishes or served whole. The biggest crops grown in the United States come from California and Florida, but most states grow radishes.

RADISHES

VARIETIES
There are five main varieties of radishes.

Red Globe
This variety is the most popular in the United States and is the familiar looking red and white radish. It is small, round or oval shaped, sometimes referred to as "button" red radishes. They range in diameter from one to four inches (most commonly closer to one inch) and have a solid, crisp, flesh. Available year-round.

Black
This variety is turnip-like in size and shape, approximately eight inches long. Black radishes have a dull black or dark brown skin. When peeled, their flesh is white, quite pungent, and drier than other radishes. Black radishes have a longer shelf-life than most radishes, so they are available year-round, although the crop peaks in winter and early spring.

Daikons
This variety is native to Asia. They are very large, carrot-shaped radishes that are up to 18 inches long and weigh one to two pounds. Daikons have a white flesh that is juicy and a bit hotter than a red radish, but milder than black. Available year-round, but are most flavorful in fall and winter.

White Icicles
This variety is long, up to a half foot, and tapered. They have a white flesh that is milder than the red variety. Generally available year-round.

California Mammoth White
A larger variety than the white icicle, these radishes have oblong-shaped roots about eight inches long. Their flesh is slightly pungent. Generally available year-round.

RADISHSelection
Radishes with their leaves intact are usually tied in bunches, while topped radishes are sold in plastic bags. If the leaves are attached, they should be crisp and green.
Whether red or white, roots should be hard and solid, with a smooth, unblemished surface. Avoid soft or spongy radishes. Be sure to check bagged radishes for mold before purchasing. Black radishes should be solid, heavy and free of cracks. This variety is often found in Russian or Polish neighborhood stores. Daikons, found most easily in Asian markets, should be evenly shaped and firm, with a glossy, almost translucent sheen.

RADISHStorage
If radishes were purchased with the leaves attached, remove the tops unless they will be served the same day. Place radishes in plastic bags, if they are not already packaged, and store in the refrigerator. Most varieties will keep up to two weeks in the refrigerator. Black radishes can be stored for months if they remain dry; store them in perforated plastic bags and keep in the refrigerator.

RADISHPreparation
Scrub radishes and trim off the stem end and tip. You may peel the radishes or leave the skin intact. The skin is responsible for much of the pungency, so the black radish is most often peeled for those not accustomed to this variety. However, the red globe and white icicle radishes are rarely hot enough to warrant peeling.

Small radishes can be served whole or chopped; while black and daikons are usually cut or grated.

The most common uses for radishes are as a garnish or as an ingredient in a green salad. EAT 5 TO 9 A DAY

  • Make Radish Part of Your 5 A Day Plan
  • Grate red radishes into pasta or bean salads for a slightly different taste and texture.
  • Add red radishes to a vegetable tray for an added bright burst of color.
  • Try a white radish variety. Add half a cup into vegetable soup.
     

TOP 

RELATED ARTICLES

ROOTS & TUBERS >>>       America's Favorite Vegetable       Beet-ing the French       Beets, Root Vegetables       Beets, Beetroot       Carrots       Carrots, What's Up Doc?       Celeriac, Celery Root      Jicama: A Versatile Tuber       Parsnips       Potatoes, Baked & Foil       Potatoes, Florida Sunlite       Potato Varieties & Types       Potatoes, Search for the Perfect       Potato Trilogy, Part 1       Potato Trilogy, Part 2       Potato Trilogy, Part 3       Radish       Root of the Matter       Rutabagas       Salsify, Oyster Plant       Sunchoke or Jerusalem Artichoke       Sweet Potato       Sweetpotatoes, Mother Nature's Best       Sweet Potato or Yam?       Sweet Potatoes, Louisiana       Sweet Potatoes And Yams       Taro Root, Dasheen, Eddo, Kalo       Turnips       Water Chestnut       Yucca Root, Manioc, Cassava

 

   Home        About Us & Contact Us        Cooking Contests        Free Magazines        Food Links  
Copyright notice

 

 

 

Popular Pages

FREE Food & Beverage Publications
An extensive selection of free magazines and other publications for qualified Food, Beverage & Hospitality professionals