FoodReference.com Logo

Food Trivia & Food Facts Section

An eclectic collection of information about various foods and beverages,
plants and animals from around the world

Home       Food Articles       Food Trivia & Facts       Today in Food History       Recipes       Cooking Tips       Food Videos       Food Quotes       Who's Who       Food Trivia Quizzes       Crosswords       Food Poems       Cookbooks       Food Posters       Recipe Contests       Culinary Schools       Gourmet Tours       Food Festivals

You are here > Home

 

 

FOOD TRIVIA and FOOD FACTS

ALABAMA to AMMONIUM       Alabama       Alaska       Albacore Tuna       Albermarle Pippin       Albert Sauce       Albondiga       Albumen       Alby's Gold Potato       Alcohol       Alcohol in Cooking       Ale Trivia       Alfalfa       Alfredo       Alginates, Alginic Acid       All Blue Potato       All Red Potato       Allergies       Alligator Trivia       Alligator Pear       Allspice       Almonds       Almond Joy       Aluminum       Amablu Blue Cheese       Amaranth       American Food       Amino Acids       Ammonium Bicarbonate

AMINO ACIDS

Amino acids function as the building blocks of proteins. Chemically, amino acids are organic compounds containing an amino (NH2) group and a carboxyl (COOH) group.

There are about 20 amino acids required by the human body, but 8 of these cannot be synthesized by our bodies. These are known as the 'essential amino acids.'  Protein foods that contain all 8 of these in sufficient quantities are called 'complete proteins'.  Some of these 'complete proteins' are egg yolks, fresh milk, liver and kidney.

Amino acids are classified as essential, nonessential and conditionally essential. If body synthesis is inadequate to meet metabolic need, an amino acid is classified as essential and must be supplied as part of the diet.

Essential amino acids include leucine, isoleucine, valine, tryptophan, phenylalanine, methionine, threonine, lysine, histidine and possibly arginine.

Nonessential amino acids can be synthesized by the body in adequate amounts, and include alanine, aspartic acid, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, glycine, proline and serine.

Conditionally essential amino acids become essential under certain clinical conditions
International Food Information Council Foundation
 

 

Please feel free to link to any pages of FoodReference.com from your website.

For permission to use any of this content please E-mail: james@foodreference.com
All contents are copyright © 1990 - 2014 James T. Ehler and www.FoodReference.com unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved.

You may copy and use portions of this website for non-commercial, personal use only.
Any other use of these materials without prior written authorization is not very nice and violates the copyright.

Please take the time to request permission.

 

 

 

 

 

Also see: Food Articles  and Cooking Tips

 

Culinary Schools
& Cooking Classes

From Amateur & Basic Cooking Classes to Professional Chef Training - Over 1,000 schools & classes listed for all 50 States, Online & Worldwide

Chef with red wine glass