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Quick-Fix Southern
by Rebecca Lang

I like to save any leftover baked sweet potatoes I have for biscuits the next day. But you have to have a baked sweet potato. On most days, you won't have a baked potato and there are no canned, unsweetened sweet potatoes at the grocery store. So, stroll on over to the baby food aisle and pick up some sweet potatoes, ready and perfect for the job.
Makes 13 to 15 biscuits


    · 1/2 cup buttermilk
    · 2 (6-ounce) jars sweet potato baby food
    · 4 cups Southern All-Purpose Flour, plus more for the counter and your hands
    · 2 tablespoons baking powder
    · 1 teaspoon salt
    · 1 cup cold unsalted butter, cut Into pieces


Preheat the oven to 425°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat.

Stir together the buttermilk and baby food in a small bowl and set aside.

Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, and butter in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Pulse 7 times or until the butter is cut into very small pieces.

Add the buttermilk mixture and process until the dough comes together, about 15 seconds.

Sprinkle some flour on the countertop. Turn the dough out onto the floured counter. Flour your hands well and pat the dough to about 3/4 inch thick.

Cut the biscuits with a floured 3-inch round cutter. Flour the cutter again before cutting each biscuit. Place the biscuits, about 1 inch apart, on the prepared baking sheet.

Bake for 16 to 18 minutes, or until slightly browned.

    TIP: Twisting the cutter as you cut a biscuit can produce lopsided biscuits. Cut straight down as you slice through the dough.

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