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See Also: Sheep

LAMB TRIVIA

There are about 70,000 sheep farms & ranches in the U.S.

Average Annual per Capita U.S. Lamb Consumption
(by retail weight)

Year

Pounds

1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009

1.4
1.4
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.5
1.4
1.4
1.3
1.2
1.2
1.1
1.1
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.2
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0

Source: USDA

Lamb is a very ancient food, and sheep were probably domesticated about 12,000 years ago. There is positive evidence they were domesticated by 8,900 B.C. in Iraq and Romania. Some of the oldest traditional recipes come from Greece and date back several thousand years.

In 2002 American meat packers produced 222 million pounds of lamb and mutton.

There are 49,760  people in the U.S. listed on whitepages.com with the last name 'Lamb'
(Mark Morton, 'Gastronomica', Fall 2010)

Frenched Rack of Lamb

AMERICAN LAMB:
Today’s American Lamb is mild flavored and can be very easy to cook - complicated recipes are not required to prepare great tasting dishes with American Lamb. Several value cuts of American Lamb are available year round. These include loin, rack, leg, shoulder, ground, shanks and ribs. American Lamb yields more meat on the bone than imported lamb. A 2002 study reported that the eye of an American Lamb rib chop provides 38% more meat than Australia and New Zealand rib chops.  American Lamb travels up to 10,000 fewer miles and about 30 days less than imported lamb. That's an advantage that speaks for itself.

Lamb Crown Roast

In a recent survey, 35% of Americans surveyed reported that they had never eaten lamb. Those who eat lamb are more likely to live in the Northeast or Western parts of the U.S. Those in the West said they are eating more lamb than last year.  The survey also reported that those surveyed said that lamb can be difficult to prepare, and therefore they do not prepare it at home.

Lamb is preferred by more men than women, and women are more likely to have never eaten lamb. The most familiar cuts of lamb are leg of lamb and lamb rib chops.
American Lamb Board (www.americanlambboard.org
 

 

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