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FOOD TRIVIA and FOOD FACTS

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Recipe Videos, Food Safety,
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See also: Sheep Trivia; Lamb Trivia; Lamb Article

MUTTON TRIVIA

There are 312 people in the U.S. listed on whitepages.com with the last name 'Mutton'
(Mark Morton, 'Gastronomica', Fall 2010)

Mutton refers to the meat of a fully grown sheep (after its first year).  Mutton is generally tougher and has a much stronger flavor than lamb.  It was once a mainstay of the British diet.


In Shakespeare's time ‘laced mutton’ referred to a prostitute:
“Ay, sir; I, a lost mutton, gave your letter to her, a laced mutton” (Two Gentlemen of Verona, I, i)
 

In 2002 American meat packers produced 222 million pounds of lamb and mutton.
american meat institute
 

Per Capita Consumption of Lamb & Mutton in U.S.
(2007): 1.0 lbs    
National Turkey Federation
 

The Bohri Muslim snack, Cream Tikka, has no cream in it.  The mutton or lamb mince has to be pounded so finely, the tikka (like a cutlet) just glides down your throat.  It is the mince which is "creamy" in texture.
(from Newsletter Subscriber, Surekha Laxmann Gholap)
 

 

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