FoodReference.com Logo

FoodReference.com   (Since 1999)

Food Articles, News & Features Section

 

  Home   ·   Food Articles   ·   Food Trivia   ·   Today in Food History   ·   Recipes   ·   Cooking Tips   ·   Videos   ·   Food Quotes   ·   Who's Who   ·   Food Trivia Quizzes   ·   Crosswords   ·   Food Poems   ·   Cookbooks   ·   Food Posters   ·   Recipe Contests   ·   Culinary Schools   ·   Gourmet Tours   ·   Food Festivals & Shows  

 

 You are here > Home > Food Articles

OTHER INGREDIENTS >  Sherry Vinegar

 

CULINARY SCHOOLS &
COOKING CLASSES

From Amateur & Basic Cooking Classes to Professional Chef Training & Degrees -  Associates, Bachelors & Masters
More than 1,000 schools & classes listed for all 50 States, Online and Worldwide

SHERRY VINEGAR

 

See also: Vinegar

There are a number of famous vinegars – balsamic, champagne, traditional Orleans style, tarragon-flavoured, or white wine vinegar and then there is sherry vinegar.

Some consider sherry vinegar the “king of all vinegars”. In fact, good quality sherry vinegar costs much more than sherry itself

This exquisite product owes its unique character to a number of factors – sherry, which comes from a well-defined viticultural region; it must be aged for at least two years, and produced by the solera system (a fractional blending technique explained in the article titled Sherry). Some companies age their vinegars for 20 – 30 years, and sell it at a small fortune!

     Sherry vinegar was always produced by accident or poor wine making practices. Sherry barrels containing too much volatile acidity are never used for sherry or brandy.  Winemakers gave the vinegar to their families or friends for cooking. They were ashamed to admit that some of their wines had too much volatile acidity and thus unfit for sherry. Most people using sherry vinegar expresse their appreciation for the intensity of flavour of this deeply flavoured vinegar.

     Around 2000, marketing-oriented executives of the Sherry Regulatory Agency in Jerez de la Frontera saw the potential of the product, and formulated regulations for uniformity.

     The product was registered with the EU head office as a unique foodstuff, subject to protection
     In the past, French chefs made good use of sherry vinegar in their marinated dishes or salad dressings, as they had access to adequate supplies but now anyone with an interest in flavourful food can buy this excellent product.

     If you live in a major urban centre in North America, you should be able to get good quality, well-aged sherry vinegar in reputable grocery stores.

     You will be surprised how a little fine vinegar can make such a huge difference in your salad dressing or any other dish you may be preparing.

Article contributed by Hrayr Berberoglu, a Professor Emeritus of Hospitality and Tourism Management specializing in Food and Beverage. Books by H. Berberoglu
 

 

FREE Food & Beverage Publications
An extensive selection of free magazines and other publications for qualified Food, Beverage & Hospitality professionals

RELATED ARTICLES

  OTHER INGREDIENTS   ·   Rice Types & Varieties   ·   Agar, agar-agar   ·   Alligator   ·   The Joy of Almonds   ·   Angel's Share   ·   Avocado Oil   ·   Balsamic Vinegar Facts   ·   Basmati Rice   ·   Brown Rice Basics   ·   Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire   ·   Chocolate: To Be Or Not To Be   ·   Chocolate   ·   Chocolate, White Chocolate   ·   Cocoa Trees & Beans   ·   Flavored Oils   ·   Flour Power I   ·   Flour Power II   ·   GRAS Food Additives   ·   Honey   ·   Honey Color and Flavor   ·   Macadamia: A Nut From Hawaii   ·   Maple Syrup: How Sweet It Is   ·   Maple Syrup Facts   ·   Meat & Poultry Additives   ·   Mesquite   ·   Mesquite Meal   ·   Miso   ·   Nitrates and Nitrites   ·   Nut Season   ·   Olive Oil   ·   Pasta, A Noodle by any Other Name   ·   Peanuts: International Taste Test   ·   Pecans: A Nut from America   ·   Pistachio Nuts   ·   Rice, You Want Rice With That?   ·   Sherry Vinegar   ·   Sorghum, Grain of the Future?   ·   Tofu Tips and Hints   ·   Vinegar   ·   Walnuts   ·   Water: Soaking Wet   ·   Wild Rice   ·   What is Yeast? (1905)  
  Home   ·   About Us & Contact Us   ·   Cooking Contests   ·   Free Magazines   ·   Food Links  

Please feel free to link to any pages of FoodReference.com from your website.
For permission to use any of this content please E-mail: james@foodreference.com
All contents are copyright © 1990 - 2014 James T. Ehler and www.FoodReference.com unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved.
You may copy and use portions of this website for non-commercial, personal use only.
Any other use of these materials without prior written authorization is not very nice and violates the copyright.
Please take the time to request permission.