An eclectic collection of facts, trivia and statistics about various foods, beverages, plants and animals

You are here > Home

Also see: Food Articles and Cooking Tips



From Amateur & Basic Cooking Classes to Professional Chef Training & Degrees -  Associates, Bachelors & Masters - More than 1,000 schools & classes listed for all 50 States, Online and Worldwide


FREE Magazines
and other Publications

An extensive selection of free magazines and other publications


(Syzygium aromaticum also Eugenia caryophyllata)

Cloves are actually dried flower buds, which are picked before they open. The clove tree is a member of the myrtle family and is native to the Spice Islands of Indonesia (Moluccas).

Indonesia uses half the world production of cloves. The cloves are mixed with tobacco to make kretek cigarettes, two parts tobacco to one part cloves.

The world's leading producer of cloves is the island of Pemba (Tanzania), 30 miles off the east coast of Africa.

The name Cloves comes from the French "clou", meaning nail. The first references to Cloves are found in Oriental literature in the Han period in China under the name "chicken-tongue spice". From the 8th Century on, Cloves became one of the major spices in European commerce. When the Clove forests were first discovered in Indonesia, all were enchanted with the fragrance and beauty of this tropical evergreen tree which "must always see the sea" in order to thrive. Cloves were extremely costly and played an important part in world history. Wars were fought to secure exclusive rights to the profitable Clove business. In the Moluccas, where Cloves were first found, parents planted a Clove tree when a child was born.

Cloves are an important ingredient in the spice blends of Sri Lanka and North India. They are used in garam masala, biryanis, and pickles. In the U.S., cloves are used in meats, salad dressings, and desserts. Clove is a key flavor contributor to ketchup and Worcestershire sauce seasoning blends. Chinese and German seasonings also depend on Cloves to flavor meats and cookies.

From The Devil’s Food Dictionary
©2006 by Barry Foy (

clove A nail-shaped, brown flower bud used whole or ground as a spice. Individual cloves have a powerful magnetic charge and, if not managed carefully, will collect in hard-to-manage clumps. They can be kept apart by jamming them firmly into a canned ham.




  CLAMS to CONNECTICUT   |   Clams   |   Clark Bar   |   Clary, Clary Sage   |   Clementine   |   Clotted Cream   |   Cloudberry   |   Cloves   |   Cluster Bean   |   Cobbler   |   Cobb Salad   |   Coca Cola   |   Cocktail   |   Cock-a-Leekie   |   Cockroaches   |   Cocoa Butter   |   Cocoa Powder   |   Coco De Mer   |  Coconut   |   Coconut Crab   |   Code of Hammurabi   |   Codfish   |   Cod Liver Oil   |   Coffee   |   Cola   |   Cola Nut   |   Cold Cut Platters   |   Cole Slaw   |   Collard Greens   |   Colorado   |   Combine Farm Machine   |   Commercials   |   Conch   |   Condensed Milk   |   Condiments   |   Confectioner's Sugar   |   Connecticut  


  Home   |   About Us & Contact Us   |   Bibliography   |   Food History Articles   |   Food Timeline   |   Free Magazines   |   Other Links  

Please feel free to link to any pages of from your website.
For permission to use any of this content please E-mail:
All contents are copyright © 1990 - 2016 James T. Ehler and unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved.
You may copy and use portions of this website for non-commercial, personal use only.
Any other use of these materials without prior written authorization is not very nice and violates the copyright.
Please take the time to request permission. Logo



Popular Pages

Free Food Magazine Subscriptions


Recipe Videos, Food Safety, Food Science, Food Festivals, Vintage Commercials, etc.