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CIDER

It takes about 36 apples to make one gallon of apple cider.

Apple cider in the U.S. is the same as apple juice. Some companies will use the term cider to refer to apple juice with no preservatives, and apple juice to juice that has been pasteurized.  Fermented apple juice which is alcoholic, is called 'hard cider' in the U.S.  Unfermented apple juice is called 'apple juice' in most other countries, and the term 'cider' refers to 'hard cider'; it has been fermented and is an alcoholic beverage.

Cider was the most common fruit beverage in the U.S. up to the mid 19th century. Without refrigeration, fresh juice was very perishable, so apple juice was virtually all 'hard cider', being allowed to ferment to a low alcohol content, usually around 5 percent alcohol. Next to water, this cider was the cheapest and most widely available beverage year-round.

The only steam-powered Cider Mill in the U.S. and is located in Mystic, Connecticut.
 

 

 

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