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FRUIT 'M' to 'Z' >  Quince Recipes

 

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See also: Quince, Fruit of the Month; Quince Facts & Trivia

QUINCE: Recipes

QUINCE MARMALADE

 

Pare and core the Quinces and cut them up, putting them into water as they are cored, to prevent them from blackening.

Put them into a preserving pan with 1 lb. sugar and 1 pint water for every lb. of fruit.

Boil over a gentle fire until soft.

Then put through a sieve, or mash with a spoon, boil up again and tie down in the same way as any other preserve.

In France, before putting the marmalade into pots, a little rosewater and a few grains of musk, mixed together, are added.

This is most delicious and among the French, by whom it is called Cotiniat, has a reputation for its digestive powers.


QUINCE AND APPLE MARMALADE

    Take equal quantities of Apple and Quinces.

    Put into an earthenware jar, 2 quarts of water and, as quickly as they can be pared and sliced, 4 lb. of Quinces.

    Stew them gently till soft and then strain them.

    They must not be boiled too long, or they will become red.

    Boil together, for ¾ hour, 4 lb. of sliced Apples, with the same weight of Quince juice.

    When it boils, take it off the fire and add 1½ lb. sugar.

    When dissolved, put it back on the fire and boil, together with the Quinces, for another 20 minutes, stirring all the time and removing the scum.

    Then pot.


QUINCE LIQUEUR OR RATAFIA

    Cut the quinces into quarters and remove the seeds.

    Shred the fruit without peeling.

    Place in a bowl, cover, and leave to stand in a cool place for 3 days.

    Squeeze them through muslin (cheesecloth) and collect the juice.

    Add an equal volume of spirit to the juice.

    For each liter of the mixture, add 1½ cups caster (superfine) sugar, 1 clove, and a small piece of cinnamon.

    Infuse in a jar for 2 months.

    Then strain through muslin (cheesecloth) and bottle.
     

 

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