FoodReference.com Logo

FoodReference.com   (Since 1999)

Food Articles, News & Features Section

 

  Home   ·   Food Articles   ·   Food Trivia   ·   Today in Food History   ·   Recipes   ·   Cooking Tips   ·   Videos   ·   Food Quotes   ·   Who's Who   ·   Food Trivia Quizzes   ·   Crosswords   ·   Food Poems   ·   Cookbooks   ·   Food Posters   ·   Recipe Contests   ·   Culinary Schools   ·   Gourmet Tours   ·   Food Festivals & Shows  

 

  You are here > 

HomeFood ArticlesFish & Seafood >  Jellyfish

 

Culinary Schools & Cooking Classes
From Amateur & Basic Cooking Classes to Professional Chef Training & Degrees -  Associates, Bachelors & Masters
More than 1,000 schools & classes listed for all 50 States, Online and Worldwide

 

FREE Food & Beverage Publications
An extensive selection of free magazines and other publications for qualified Food, Beverage & Hospitality professionals

CANNONBALL JELLYFISH

 

DESCRIPTION

Unlike typical jellyfish the cannonball is a strong swimmer with a compact, solid body and few stinging tentacles. The Latin name for the cannonball, Stomolophus meleagris, is very descriptive of its lifestyle and means "many mouthed hunter." The cannonball feeds and swims by pumping water with a gelatinous bell over the sticky folds of its arms trapping larval stages of oysters, clams, and a variety of crustaceans. This sticky mucus is passed to numerous openings among the arms that lead to its mouth. It is abundant along Florida's northern Gulf of Mexico and off the northern Atlantic Coast, occurring in groups of millions.

jellyfish

The cannonball has great potential value as a food item in the world market. The most important fact about the protein in the cannonball jellyfish is the collagen it contains. Our bodies need collagen to build cell tissue, cartilage, teeth and bones. Scientific research continues on collagen and its medical potential. For over a thousand years, Asians have been eating jellyfish for medicinal reasons to treat high blood pressure, arthritis, bronchitis and other diseases. The cannonball jellyfish is an ideal diet food because it is low in fat, cholesterol and calories.

Jellyfish are most efficiently caught with surface trawls. Because they spoil quickly, processing must occur immediately after harvest. Jellyfish are mostly water and must be dehydrated to obtain products of desirable structure and texture. Processing involves a step-wise reduction of water by salting and draining many times. Once the process is complete, dried jellyfish can be safely stored for many weeks.
 

JELLYFISH ATTRIBUTES

Processed jellyfish (sold only in processed form): Tender, crunchy and elastic texture.
 

HOW MUCH TO BUY

Generally jellyfish can be added to salads or prepared vegetables. Amount is determined by personal preference.
 

BUYING, STORAGE AND HANDLING

    • Immediately after harvesting through a salting and dehydration method jellyfish is processed. It is sold in this dehydrated form.

    • In the United States you can buy jellyfish in Asian specialty markets

    • Store in the refrigerator.
     

PREPARATION

    • Soak the dehydrated jellyfish overnight in the refrigerator, drain and rinse. Cut the jellyfish into thin strips and quickly blanch. Marinate in seasoning of your choice, and then add to salads or vegetables.

    • Keep raw and cooked seafood separate to prevent bacterial cross-contamination.

    • After handling raw seafood thoroughly wash knives, cutting surfaces, sponges and your hands with hot soapy water.

    • Always marinate seafood in the refrigerator.

    • Discard marinade; it contains raw juices which may harbor bacteria.

    • When marinade is needed for basting reserve a portion before adding raw seafood.
     

COOKING

To prepare processed (dried) jellyfish, soak in water overnight in the refrigerator, drain and rinse. Cut into thin strips and quickly blanch in boiling water. Marinate in a mixture of seasonings and add to vegetables or salads.
 

NUTRITION

Nutritional values for approximately 4 ounces (114 grams) of raw, edible portions

    Calories 30  
    Calories From Fat 0  
    Total Fat 0 g
    Saturated Fat 0 g
    Cholesterol 0 mg
    Sodium 120 mg
    Total Carbohydrates 0 g
    Protein 8 g

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services  www.fl-seafood.com
 

 

RELATED ARTICLES

  Fish & Seafood   ·   Tilefish: History & Facts   ·   Amberjack Facts & Use   ·   Mullet Fish   ·   Tilapia Description & Facts   ·   Tilapia: Grilling Perfect Tilapia   ·   King Mackerel   ·   Spanish Mackerel   ·   Grouper   ·   Snapper   ·   Bighead Carp   ·   Asian Carp Become A Major Problem   ·   World Fisheries In Crises   ·   Swai Fish (Pangasius)   ·   Alaskan Wild Black Cod   ·   Aquaculture Production & the Environment   ·   Bluefish   ·   Catch Shares Fisheries Management   ·   Catfish, Farm Raised   ·   Caviar From Russia with Love   ·   Caviar: Description & Facts   ·   Cod: British Gold   ·   Cyanide Fishing   ·   Fish Facts & Health Benefits   ·   Fish Farms: Raising Fish on Inland 'Farms'   ·   Fish, Becoming More Expensive by the Day   ·   Fish, Something Fishy Going On Here   ·  Flounder   ·   Jellyfish   ·   King Salmon   ·   Komoci Konbu, Herring Eggs on Kelp   ·   Mackerel, Wild   ·   Mahi-Mahi   ·   Pompano   ·   Ocean Fisheries & Overfishing   ·   Salmon, Wild or Farmed   ·   Salmon of Wisdom   ·   Salmon Facts & Types   ·   Salmon, Wild Salmon & Dams   ·   Sockeye Salmon Record Run   ·   Shark   ·   Shark Finning   ·   Smoked Fish   ·   Striped Bass   ·   Sushi Fact Sheet   ·   Swordfish   ·   Trout: Fit for a King   ·   Trout In Trouble   ·   Atlantic Bluefin Tuna in Trouble   ·   Tuna on the Grill   ·   Yellowfin Tuna   ·   Whales Still Hunted in 2012  
  Home   ·   About & Contact Us   ·   Recipe Contests   ·   Food Timeline   ·   Food Links  

Please feel free to link to any pages of FoodReference.com from your website.
For permission to use any of this content please E-mail: james@foodreference.com
All contents are copyright © 1990 - 2014 James T. Ehler and www.FoodReference.com unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved.
You may copy and use portions of this website for non-commercial, personal use only.
Any other use of these materials without prior written authorization is not very nice and violates the copyright.
Please take the time to request permission.