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HomeFood ArticlesKitchen Equipment >  Hints for Housekeepers (1905)

 

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Hints For Housekeepers

 

A Book For A Cook
(1905 - The Pillsbury Co)

CHINA CEMENT.
Take dissolved gum arabic and stir in enough plaster of Paris to make a soft paste. This is almost colorless and acts excellently as cement for China. Very delicate china or porcelain has the pieces tied carefully in place with tape. It is then put into a saucepan of milk and the latter is very gradually brought to the boiling point. Remove the saucepan from the fire, but leave the china in it for about six minutes. Lift out carefully and place on a shelf to dry.

RUST STAINS ON WHITE GOODS.
Lemon juice and salt will remove rust stains from linen or muslin without affecting the white goods. Let the sun shine on the goods after having moistened the spots with the mixture—two or three applications may be necessary.

GRASS STAINS ON CLOTHING.
Should be saturated with alcohol for a little time, then wash in clear water.

KEROSENE OIL.
Coal oil will help the housekeeper out of many difficulties.

A spoonful of Kerosene added to a kettle of very hot water will make windows, looking-glasses and picture glasses bright and clear. Use a small, clean cloth, wring it dry and rub it over the glass, after wiping down the framework with an oiled cloth. Then proceed to the next window and treat it similarly on both sides. After that go back to the first One and wipe it dry with a large clean cloth. No real polishing is required, and the window or glass will look clear and shiny.

Kerosene will clean your hands better than any- thing else after blacking a range or stove. Pour a little in the water, wash your hands in it, then wash them in tepid water, and finally with plenty of soap, and a stiff nail brush in hot water. Finish up by rubbing the hands with lemon and rosewater and glycerine.

When your kitchen sink is rusty, rub it over with kerosene.

Squeaky shoes are cured by dipping the soles in kerosene. Enough to reach the top of the soles without reaching the upper leather.

The white spots appearing in the spring on the lining of your refrigerator will disappear if you rub the zinc with kerosene. Leave the refrigerator open several hours, then wash with water, soap and some ammonia. The refrigerator will then be clean and sweet and all spots will have disappeared.

TO SOFTEN BOOTS AND SHOES.
Rub your shoes and boots well with castor oil and let them stand twelve hours. This will keep them from cracking and make them yielding and soft.

 

INK SPOTS ON FINGERS.
Ink is removed from the fingers in a very simple manner. Wet the finger and then rub the phosphorus end of a match on the spot. Wipe the fingers and renew the action until the spot has dis- appeared in a minute or two.

KEEPING OLIVE OIL SWEET.
Always keep olive oil in the refrigerator tightly corked. Never put more than two days' supply into your table cruet.

COOLING BEDS IN SUMMERTIME.
A piece of Chinese Matting slipped between the sheet and the mattress will be found to be decidedly cooling. A hot water bag, filled with ice-water laid under the pillow will have the same effect.

MOLASSES.
If molasses tastes acid, put a teaspoon of soda in each cupful of molasses.

CLEANING PAINT.
Put two ounces of soda in a quart of hot water, and wash with it, rinsing the paint off with pure water.

CURING HANGNAILS.
A small quantity of Collodion procured at any drug store, applied with a small brush to the skin around the nails will have the desired effect in from three to four days in curing hangnails.

Collodion is excellent in cases of burns or cuts. It excludes air and dust.

CURE FOR TOOTHACHE.
Heat two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Dip a little absorbent cotton in the hot vinegar and apply it to the gum at the root of the aching tooth.

RELEASING ICE CREAM OR JELLY FROM MOLDS.
Fold a hot cloth around the mold and jelly or ices will leave the mold without sticking.

REMOVING STARCH FROM IRONS.
Should starch cling to your iron while using it, sprinkle some salt on a piece of brown paper and run the iron on it.
 

 

 

 

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