FoodReference.com Logo

FoodReference.com   (Since 1999)

Food Articles, News & Features Section

 

  Home   ·   Food Articles   ·   Food Trivia   ·   Today in Food History   ·   Recipes   ·   Cooking Tips   ·   Videos   ·   Food Quotes   ·   Who's Who   ·   Food Trivia Quizzes   ·   Crosswords   ·   Food Poems   ·   Cookbooks   ·   Food Posters   ·   Recipe Contests   ·   Culinary Schools   ·   Gourmet Tours   ·   Food Festivals & Shows  

 

  You are here > 

HomeFood ArticlesArgentinian to Indian Cuisine >  What is Geo-Tourism?

 

Culinary Schools & Cooking Classes
From Amateur & Basic Cooking Classes to Professional Chef Training & Degrees -  Associates, Bachelors & Masters
More than 1,000 schools & classes listed for all 50 States, Online and Worldwide

 

FREE Food & Beverage Publications
An extensive selection of free magazines and other publications for qualified Food, Beverage & Hospitality professionals

WHAT IS GEOTOURISM?

 

Dear EarthTalk:
I’ve heard of Eco-Tourism, but what on Earth is “Geo-Tourism?
Sally Kardaman, Sumter, SC

“Geotourism” describes tourism that sustains or enhances the geographical character of a given place, including its environment, culture, aesthetics, heritage and the well-being of local residents. The idea is that tourism can be a positive force that benefits both travelers and local environments and economies.

National Geographic Senior Editor Jonathan Tourtellot coined the term in 1997 to distinguish it from “ecotourism” or “sustainable tourism,” both which more narrowly focus on travel’s ecological impacts. In addition to a “do-no-harm” ethic, geotourism seeks to enhance prospects for sustainable development based on the specific character of a given place rather than on standardized international branding, generic architecture and food, etc. In other words, a geotourism tour won’t involve sending you to an exotic locale only to put you up at a Hilton or Marriot and give you discount coupons to Taco Bell and McDonald’s.

Rio Tropicales Lodge
Geotourism describes tourism that sustains or enhances the geographical character of a given place, including its environment, culture, aesthetics, heritage and the well-being of local residents. The idea is that tourism can be a positive force that benefits both travelers and local environments and economies. Pictured: The Rio Tropicales Lodge, a geotourism operator in Costa Rica
Photo Credit: Anjum Malkana, courtesy Flickr

“Today the world’s great destinations are under assault as visitor numbers rise exponentially every year,” reports the non-profit National Geographic Society, publisher of National Geographic. “The result is damage to the sites, overcrowding and erosion of the local culture and environment.” The Society hopes to reverse these trends with geotourism. Its Center for Sustainable Destinations (CSD) helps local communities, governments, tourism bureaus and private businesses enhance and sustain their distinct character while harnessing the power of tourism for positive impact: “Residents discover their own heritage by learning that things they take for granted may be interesting to outsiders,” reports CSD. “As local people develop pride and skill in showing off their locale, tourists get more out of their visit.”

The Society’s “Geotourism Charter” lists 13 principles that qualifying sites must adhere to in order to earn a geotourism distinction. The main current running through the Charter is appreciation for the distinctive aspects of a given place and culture, and an eagerness to showcase them to curious and supportive visitors.

The term geotourism is fairly new, but several places have offered “geotourism”-worthy travel for years. Costa Rica’s Rio Tropicales Lodge takes visitors white water rafting, horseback riding, hiking and on other rainforest excursions. It hires and trains locals to manage operations and teach guests about local cultures first-hand—and has launched several reforestation efforts and an education program that teaches elementary students across Costa Rica about the importance of protecting the rainforest in their backyards.

Another organization is 3 Sisters Adventure Trekking in Nepal, which trains local women to be tourism professionals and trekking guides. In just a few short years the group, which promotes low-impact treks in the Himalaya region, has trained 600 women as ambassadors to the outdoors across Nepal and beyond.

Aspiring geotourism professionals can learn about their future profession by focusing on it as part of a new concentration within the geography department of Missouri State University.

CONTACTS: CSD, http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/sustainable
Rio Tropicales, www.riostropicales.com   3 Sisters, www.3sistersadventure.com
Missouri State University Geotourism Concentration, www.missouristate.edu/academics/details.aspx?id=81642

 

February 2013
EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E - The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com    Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe

 

 

RELATED ARTICLES

  Argentinian to Indian Cuisine   ·   What is Geo-Tourism?   ·   A Greener Hotel Industry   ·   Argentina, A Culinary Journey   ·   Asian Sauces   ·   Australia: Eucalyptus & Vegemite   ·   Belize: New Catch & Release Law   ·   Bermudian Cusine   ·   UK Canned Food Week   ·   British Food & Drink Festivals   ·   Britian's National Curry Week   ·   English Cookery   ·   England: Cornwall Legends & Legacies   ·   Canadian Foods, Authentic   ·   Canadian Gastronomy   ·   Canada: Niagara Peninsula Gastronomy   ·   Canada: Niagara Food & Wine Classic   ·   Carbohydrates of the World   ·   China: Sichuan Cuisine   ·   China: Happy Chinese New Year   ·   China: Hot Pot!   ·   Curry   ·   European Fruits And Vegetables   ·   French Food   ·   France: Provence   ·   France: A la Normande   ·   France: Alsace Cuisine   ·   French Food Markets   ·   France: Rungis, World's Biggest Food Market   ·   Hungarian Food   ·   India: A Food Tour of India   ·   Indian Cuisine   ·   India: Bengali Cuisine  
  Home   ·   About & Contact Us   ·   Recipe Contests   ·   Food Timeline   ·   Food Links  

Please feel free to link to any pages of FoodReference.com from your website.
For permission to use any of this content please E-mail: james@foodreference.com
All contents are copyright © 1990 - 2014 James T. Ehler and www.FoodReference.com unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved.
You may copy and use portions of this website for non-commercial, personal use only.
Any other use of these materials without prior written authorization is not very nice and violates the copyright.
Please take the time to request permission.