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Herb Quotes

"There's fennel for you, and columbines; there's rue for you; and here's some for me; we may call it herb of grace o'Sundays."
William Shakespeare, ‘Hamlet’

 

“Much Virtue in Herbs, little in Men.”
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) Poor Richard's Almanac

 

"Those herbs which perfume the air most delightfully, not passed by as the rest, but, being trodden upon and crushed, are three; that is, burnet, wild thyme and watermints. Therefore, you are to set whole alleys of them, to have the pleasure when you walk or tread."
Frances Bacon

 

"Hot lavender, mints, savory, marjoram; The marigold, that goes to bed wi' the sun, and with him rise weeping."
Shakespeare, ‘The Winter's Tale’

 

“Parsley - the jewel of herbs, both in the pot and on the plate.”
Albert Stockli

 

“Oh, better no doubt is a dinner of herbs,
When season'd with love, which no rancour disturbs
And sweeten'd by all that is sweetest in life
Than turbot, bisque, ortolans, eaten in strife!
But if, out of humour, and hungry, alone
A man should sit down to dinner, each one
Of the dishes which the cook chooses to spoil
With a horrible mixture of garlic and oil,
The chances are ten against one, I must own,
He gets up as ill-tempered as when he sat down.”

Edward Bulwer-Lytton (1831-1891) ‘Lucile’ (1860)

 

“Time is an herb that cures all Diseases.”
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) Poor Richard's Almanac

 

“An ounce of Yarrow sewed up in flannel and placed under the pillow before going to bed, having repeated the following words, brought a vision of the future husband or wife:
'Thou pretty herb of Venus' tree,
Thy true name it is Yarrow;
Now who my bosom friend must be,
Pray tell thou me to-morrow.'”

‘Halliwell's Popular Rhymes, etc.’

 

“As for rosemary, I let it run all over my garden walls, not only because my bees love it but because it is the herb sacred to remembrance and to friendship, whence a sprig of it hath a dumb language.”
Sir Thomas More (1478-1535)

 

“The leaves and floures of Borrage put into wine make men and women glad and merry, driving away all sadnesse, dulnesse, and melancholy, as Dioscorides and Pliny affirme.  Syrrup made of the floures of Borrage comforteth the heart, purgeth melancholy, and quieteth the phrenticke or lunaticke person.”
John Gerard, ‘The Herball, or General Historie of Plantes’ (1597)

 

“Pounding fragrant things -- particularly garlic, basil, parsley -- is a tremendous antidote to depression. But it applies also to juniper berries, coriander seeds and the grilled fruits of the chilli pepper. Pounding these things produces an alteration in one's being -- from sighing with fatigue to inhaling with pleasure. The cheering effects of herbs and alliums cannot be too often reiterated. Virgil's appetite was probably improved equally by pounding garlic as by eating it.”
Patience Gray, cookery author

 

“If one consults enough herbals...every sickness known to humanity will be listed as being cured by sage.”
Varro Taylor, Ph.D. (herb expert)

 

Sage cures Everything!!!    
"Good for diseases of the liver and to make blood. A decoction of the leaves and branches of Sage made and drunk, saith Dioscorides, provokes urine and causeth the hair to become black. It stayeth the bleeding of wounds and cleaneth ulcers and sores. Three spoonsful of the juice of Sage taken fasting with a little honey arrests spitting or vomiting of blood in consumption. It is profitable for all pains in the head coming of cold rheumatic humours, as also for all pains in the joints, whether inwardly or outwardly. The juice of Sage in warm water cureth hoarseness and cough. Pliny saith it cureth stinging and biting serpents. Sage is of excellent use to help the memory, warming and quickening the senses. The juice of Sage drunk with vinegar hath been of use in the time of the plague at all times. Gargles are made with Sage, Rosemary, Honeysuckles and Plantains, boiled in wine or water with some honey or alum put thereto, to wash sore mouths and throats, as need requireth. It is very good for stitch or pains in the sides coming of wind, if the place be fomented warm with the decoction in wine and the herb also, after boiling, be laid warm thereto."
Nicholas Culpepper, 'A Physicall Directory' (1649)

 

 

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