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FOOD QUOTES SECTION

Quotations, sayings and aphorisms about food and beverages, eating and drinking, food appreciation, restaurants, chefs, cooks, food critics, etc.

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Bread Food Quotes

“All sorrows are less with bread.”
Miguel de Cervantes, Spanish author. (1547-1616)
 

“I like reality that tastes like bread.”
Jean Anouilh (1910-1987)
 

“Malta is the only country in the world where the local delicacy is the bread.”
Alan Coren, writer, humorist (1938-2007)
 

“Man does not live by bread alone, even presliced bread.”
D.W. Brogan
 

“Bread rises when infected with the yeast germ because millions of these little worms have been born and have died, and from their dead and decaying bodies there rises a gas just as it does from the dead body of a hog.”
Mr. & Mrs. Eugene Christian
'Uncooked foods and How to Use Them' (1905)

 

“The early decay and death of our most promising American families unquestionably are due to almost universal use of new fermented bread.”
Shirley Dare, Los Angeles Times (1894)
 

“Meat! We are going to eat some meat; and what meat!  Real game! Still no bread, though.”
Ned Land in Jules Verne's 'Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea' (1870)
 

“The bread I eat in London, is a deleterious paste, mixed up with chalk, alum, and bone ashes: insipid to the taste, and destructive to the constitution.”
Tobias Smollett, 'The Expedition of Humphrey Clinker' (1771)
 

“I would say to housewives, be not daunted by one failure, nor by twenty. Resolve that you will have good bread, and never cease striving after this result till you have effected it. If persons without brains can accomplish this, why cannot you?”
’Housekeeping In Old Virginia' Marion Cabell Tyree ed. (1878)
 

“Sometimes I pray to Cod for the veal-power to stop playing with my food words, but I fear it's too bread into me. For all I know, the wurst may be yet to come.
Mark Morton, 'Arts & Scantlings' (Gastronomica, Fall 2006)
 

“Bread is a staple article of diet in theory, rather than in practice. There are few who are truly fond of bread in its simplest, most pure, and most healthful state....Is there one person in a thousand who would truly enjoy a meal of simple bread of two days old?”
William Andrus Alcott, ‘The Young House-keeper’ (1846)
 

“Blues is to jazz what yeast is to bread. Without it, it's flat.”
Carmen McRae, Jazz vocalist and pianist. (1920-1994)
 

“Good bread is the great need in poor homes, and oftentimes the best appreciated luxury in the homes of the very rich.”
‘A Book for A Cook’, The Pillsbury Co. (1905)
 

“Give me yesterday's Bread, this Day's Flesh, and last Year's Cyder.”
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) ‘Poor Richard's Almanac’
 

“Oh, God above, if heaven has a taste it must be an egg with butter and salt, and after the egg is there anything in the world lovlier than fresh warm bread and a mug of sweet golden tea?”
Frank McCourt, ‘Angela's Ashes’ (1996)
 

“In the social state to which we have come today, it is hard to imagine a nation which would live solely on bread and vegetables.”
Jean-Antheleme Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826)
‘The Physiology of Taste’ (1825)
 

“Bread is the king of the table and all else is merely the court that surrounds the king. The countries are the soup, the meat, the vegetables, the salad but bread is king.”
Louis Bromfield, American novelist  (1896-1956)
 

“....do not, as you value the health and happiness of those who sit at your table, place before them hot leavened bread or biscuit.”
Sarah Josepha Hale, 'The Good Housekeeper' (1839)
 

“Among those kinds of food which the good housekeeper should scrupulously banish from her table, is that of hot leavened bread....I believe it more often lays the foundation of diseases of the stomach, than any other kind of nourishment, used among us.”
Sarah Josepha Hale, 'The Good Housekeeper' (1839)
 

“There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread.”
Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948)
 

“Good bread is the most fundamentally satisfying of all foods; and good bread with fresh butter, the greatest of feasts.”
James Beard (1903-1985)
 

“If thou tastest a crust of bread, thou tastest all the stars and all the heavens.”
Robert Browning (1812-1889) English poet
 

"How can a nation be great if its bread tastes like Kleenex?"
Julia Child
 

"Bread is the warmest, kindest of all words. Write it always with a capital letter, like your own name."
from a café sign
 

"If bread is the first necessity of life, recreation is a close second."
Edward Bellamy, American writer (1850-1898)
 

"The first time I ate organic whole-grain bread I swear it tasted like roofing material."
Robin Williams
 

"I understand the big food companies are developing a tearless onion. I think they can do it -- after all, they've already given us tasteless bread."
Robert Orben
 

"In Paris today millions of pounds of bread are sold daily, made during the previous night by those strange, half-naked beings one glimpses through cellar windows, whose wild-seeming cries floating out of those depths always makes a painful impression. In the morning, one sees these pale men, still white with flour, carrying a loaf under one arm, going off to rest and gather new strength to renew their hard and useful labor when night comes again. I have always highly esteemed the brave and humble workers who labor all night to produce those soft but crusty loaves that look more like cake than bread."
Alexandre Dumas, French writer (1802-1870)
 

"Honest bread is very well - it's the butter that makes the temptation."
Douglas Jerrold (1803-1857)
 

"I am going to learn to make bread to-morrow. So you may imagine me with my sleeves rolled up, mixing flour, milk, saleratus, etc., with a deal of grace. I advise you if you don't know how to make the staff of life to learn with dispatch."
Emily Dickinson, American poet (1830-1886)
 

"Of all smells, bread; of all tastes, salt."
George Herbert, English poet (1593-1633)
 

"The smell of good bread baking, like the sound of lightly flowing water, is indescribable in its evocation of innocence and delight."
M. F. K. Fisher (1908-1992)
 

"O God! that bread should be so dear,
And flesh and blood so cheap!"

Thomas Hood, British poet (1799-1845)
 

"Without bread all is misery."
William Cobbett, British journalist (1763?-1835)
 

"The smell of good bread baking, like the sound of lightly flowing water, is indescribable in its evocation of innocence and delight..."
M. F. K. Fisher, ‘The Art of Eating’
 

"[Breadbaking is] one of those almost hypnotic businesses, like a dance from some ancient ceremony. It leaves you filled with one of the world's sweetest smells...there is no chiropractic treatment, no Yoga exercise, no hour of meditation in a music-throbbing chapel. that will leave you emptier of bad thoughts than this homely ceremony of making bread."
M. F. K. Fisher, ‘The Art of Eating’
 

"Sesame seeds and Poppy seeds are the only officially acceptable "spots" that should be seen on the surface of any loaf of bread. Fuzzy and hairy looking white or green growth areas are a good indication that your bread has turned into a pharmaceutical laboratory experiment."
unknown
 

"The peasants of Sicily, who have kept their own wheat and make their own natural brown bread, ah, it is amazing how fresh and sweet and clean their loaf seems, so perfumed, as home-made bread used all to be before the war."
D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930) ‘Sea and Sardinia’
 

"You can travel fifty thousand miles in America without once tasting a piece of good bread."
Henry Miller, American writer (1891-1980)
 

"Bread deals with living things, with giving life, with growth, with the seed, the grain that nurtures.  Its not coincidence that we say bread is the staff of life."
Lionel Poilne
 

"Bread is like dressed, hats and shoes -- in other words, essential!"
Emily Post
 

“There would have to be bread, some rich, whole-grain bread and zwieback, and perhaps on a long, narrow dish some pale Westphalian ham laced with strips of white fat like an evening sky with bands of clouds. There would be some tea ready to be drunk, yellowish golden tea in glasses with silver saucers, giving off a faint fragrance.”
Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926)
 

“Who hath not met with home-made bread,
A heavy compound of putty and lead.”

Thomas Hood (1799-1845)
 

“Acorns were good till bread was found.”
Francis Bacon, English philosopher, statesman (1561-1626)
 

“An egg of one hour old, bread of one day, a goat of one month, wine of six months, flesh of a year, fish of ten years and a wife of twenty years, a friend among a hundred, are the best of all number.”
John Wodroephe, English commentator. 'Spared Hours' 1623
 

“Bread, milk and butter are of venerable antiquity. They taste of the morning of the world.”
Leigh Hunt (1784-1859), 'The Seer'
 

“Without wishing in the slightest degree to disparage the skill and labour of breadmakers by trade, truth compels us to assert our conviction of the superior wholesomeness of bread made in our own homes.”
Eliza Acton, ‘Modern Cookery for Private Families’ (1845)
 

 

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