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 1796 COOKBOOKMEATS >  To Dress a Turtle >



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Recipes from American Cookery
 by Amelia Simmons (1796)

To dress a Turtle

Fill a boiler or kettle, with a quantity of water sufficient to scald the callapach and callapee, the fins, &c. and about 9 o'clock hang up your turtle by the hind fins, cut of the head and save the blood, take a sharp pointed knife and separate the callapach from the callapee, or the back from the belly part, down to the shoulders, so as to come at the entrails which take out, and clean them, as you would those of any other animal, and throw them into a tub of clean water, taking great care not to break the gall, but to cut it off from the liver and throw it away, then separate each distinctly and put the guts into another vessel, open them with a small pen-knife end to end, wash them clean, and draw them through a woolen cloth, in warm water, to clear away the slime and then put them in clean cold water till they are used with the other part of the entrails, which must be cut up small to be mixed in the baking dish with the meat; this done separate the back and belly pieces, entirely cutting away the fore fins by the upper joint, which scald; peel off to loose skin and cut them into small pieces, laying them by themselves, either in another vessel, or on the table, ready to be seasoned; then cut off the meat from the belly part and clean the back from the lungs, kidneys, &c. and that meat cut into pieces as small as a walnut, laying it likewise by itself; after this, you are to scald the back and belly pieces, pulling off the shell from the back, and the yellow skin from the belly, when all will be white and clean, and with the kitchen cleaver cut those up likewise into pieces about the bigness or breadth of a card; -- put those pieces into clean cold water, wash them and place them in a heap on the table, so that each part may lay by itself; the meat being thus prepared and laid separate for seasoning; mix two thirds of salt or rather more, and one third part of cayenne pepper, black pepper, and a nutmeg, and mace pounded fine, and mixt all together; the quantity to be proportioned to the size of the turtle, so that in each dish there may be about three spoonfuls of seasoning to every twelve pound of meat; your meat being thus seasoned get some sweet herbs, such as thyme, savory, &c. let them be dried and rubb'd fine, and having provided some deep dishes to bake it in, which should be of the common brown ware, put in the coarsest part of the meat, put a quarter pound of butter at the bottom of the each dish -- and then put some of each of the several parcels of meat, so that the dishes may be all alike and have equal positions of the different parts of the turtle, and between each laying of meat strew a little of the mixture of sweet herbs, fill your dishes within an inch into half, or two inches of the top; boil the blood of the turtle, and put into it, then lay on forced meat balls, made of veal, highly seasoned with the same seasoning as the turtle; put in each dish a gill of Madeira wine, and as much water as it will conveniently hold, then break over it five or six eggs to keep the meat from scorching at the top, and over that shake a handful of shred parsley, to make it look green, when done put your dishes into an oven made hot enough to bake bread and, and in an hour and half, or two hours (according to the size of the dishes) it will be sufficiently done.


MEATS     |     Alamode Beef     |     General Rules for Boiling     |     Roast Lamb     |     Roast Mutton     |     Roast Veal     |     Soup of Lamb’s Head and Pluck     |     Soup, Made of a Beef’s Hock     |     To Alamode a Round of Beef     |     To Alamode a Round     |     To Boil Ham     |     To Broil a Beef Stake     |     To Broil Chickens     |     To Dress a Beef Stake     |     To Dress a Calve’s head     |     To Dress a Turtle     |     To Roast Beef     |     To Smother a Fowl in Oysters     |     Stuff Leg of Pork, Bake or Roast     |     To Stuff a Leg of Veal     |     To Stuff a Pig, to Roast or Bake     |     To Stuff a Turkey     |     To Stuff and Roast a Goslin     |     To Stuff & Roast a Turkey or Fowl     |     To Stuff and Roast 4 Chickens     |     Veal Soup     |     Veal Stake

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