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Food History, Trivia, Quotes, Humor, Poetry, Recipes
March 15, 2002     Vol 3 #9   ISSN 1535-5659
James T. Ehler, Editor,
 By subscription only!  You are receiving this newsletter
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 Unsubscribe instructions are at the end of this newsletter.

    =>  Website News
    =>  Quotes and Trivia
    =>  Ancient & Classic Recipes
    =>  Food Trivia Questions
    =>  Readers questions
    =>  Did you know?
    =>  Who's Who in the Culinary Arts
    =>  Requested Recipes
    =>  Answer to Food Trivia Question
    =>  Subscribe/Unsubscribe information


CHECK THE WEBSITE DAILY - I am posting a new FOOD QUIZ questions
each day on the website, along with a Daily Culinary Quote,
Daily Trivia and other interesting food items.

Beginning May 1, 2002 I will be adding some NEW members only
areas and features to the website and newsletter.
CLICK this link for information:


"Yoghurt is very good for the stomach, the lumbar regions,
appendicitis and apotheosis."
Eugene Ionesco, Romanian writer (1912-1994)


Female asparagus stalks are plumper than male stalks.


The Food Trivia Quizzes are now moved to their own separate section after the newsletter is e-mailed. Check the Navigation Bar at the top of the page.



QUESTION: Could you tell me why they call a sundae a "sundae"
and not a "sunday"? When was the first sundae made?
Thanks much!  May O.

ANSWER: The earliest known reference to an ice cream sundae is
in 'Modern Guide to Soda Dispensers', W.A. Bonham (1897). In
the late 19th century serving or drinking carbonated beverages
on Sunday was frowned upon, and in many places actually against
the law. There were many restrictive 'Sunday' laws on the
books at that time.  Ice cream sodas were popular ---So - the
'ice cream sundae' was an ice cream soda - without the soda,
and could safely be consumed on Sunday!   So as not to offend
the moralists and religious conservatives, the terms 'sundi'
and 'sundae' were used so as not to take the name of the
Lord's day in vain.


"A good meal must be as harmonious as a symphony and as well-
constructed as a Norman cathedral.
Fernand Point, (1897-1955) 'Ma gastronomie'


George J. French introduced his French's mustard in 1904, the
same year that the hot dog was introduced to America at the
St. Louis World's Fair.



The Inglenook Cook Book (1906)
Dress squirrel ready to cook, cook until meat will fall off
the bones, then let cool; work out the bones with the hands,
and chop meat fine; season with a little salt, pepper, and
sage; make into cakes; roll in corn meal, and fry in butter.

Sister Effie I. House, Montserrat, Mo.


"Every morning one must start from scratch, with nothing on
the stoves. That is cuisine."
Fernand Point (1897-1955)


Oxtail soup very likely originated during the French Revolution
when the slaughterhouses sent the their hides to the tanneries
without cleaning them, leaving on the tails. A French noble
asked for a tail, which was willingly given to him, and he
created the first oxtail soup. Soon, the tanners began charging
for the tails because of the constant demand that had been
created for them. The dish was probably introduced to England
by French refugees from the 'terror'.


Don’t forget to check David Jenkins,
he features some of my articles and recipes in addition to some
GREAT content from chefs around the world.


"Large, naked, raw carrots are acceptable as food only to
those who live in hutches eagerly awaiting Easter."
Fran Lebowitz


Quince is not edible when raw (very hard, bitter and tart), but
when thoroughly cooked, makes an excellent preserve.


Pierre Franey (1921-1996)
A French chef who became famous as the chef of 'Le Pavillon'
restaurant in New York City from 1945 to 1960. He published
several cookbooks and worked with Craig Claiborne on the New
York Times food column, 'The 60 Minute Gourmet'.


Hi James, You are in Key West, so how about a recipe for conch
fritters?  Roberta P.
Conch Fritters
Serving Size : 5   

  Amount Measure      Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
     1/2           Cup Celery -- chopped
     1/2       Medium Yellow Onion -- chopped
     1/4       Medium Green Bell Pepper -- chopped
     1/2         pound Conch Meat -- ground
  1              whole Egg
  1              Each Egg White
  2        Tablespoons Milk
     1/4   tablespoon White Wine
     1/4   tablespoon Tabasco Sauce
  1          Teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce
  6        Tablespoons Flour
     1/3           cup Italian bread crumbs
     1/4         ounce Granulated Sugar
  1          Teaspoon Baking powder
     1/4     teaspoon Salt
     1/8     teaspoon Cayenne pepper
     1/4   tablespoon White pepper
     1/3     Teaspoon Italian Seasoning
  2        Tablespoons Parmesan Cheese -- grated

Mix all ingredients together in mixer with paddle.
Or mix by hand.

Put all ingredients in before turning on...
do not not undermix

Refrigerate for 2 hours. Deep Fry at 350 F.
Use ice cream scoop, do not make too big.
They will be fairly dark in color when they are done.

Serving Ideas : Serve with cocktail sauce.

 Email your recipe requests, food info or history
 questions to me at
"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an
airline - it helps if you have some kind of a football team,
or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer."
Frank Zappa


All true Roquefort cheese has a red sheep brand on the
foil label.


"There is more simplicity in the man who eats caviar on
impulse than in the man who eats Grape-Nuts on principle."
G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936)


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Americans drink over 13 billion gallons of soft drinks each year.


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 Food Reference WebSite at


"Of all smells, bread; of all tastes, salt."
George Herbert, English poet (1593-1633)


Henry Tate, an English sugar merchant, patented a method of
cutting sugar into small cubes in 1872. He made a fortune.


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 Food Reference Newsletter  ISSN 1535-5659
 James T. Ehler (webmaster, cook, chef, writer)
 3920 S. Roosevelt Blvd
 Suite 209 South
 Key West, Florida 33040
 E-mail:   Phone: (305) 296-2614
 Food Reference WebSite:

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