FOOD REFERENCE WEBSITE

Foodreference.com - Newsletter Archives

Home   |    Food Articles   |    Food Trivia   |    Cooking Tips   |    Recipes   |    Food Quotes   |    Who's Who   |    Food Timeline   |    Videos   |    Trivia Quizzes   |    Crosswords   |    Food Poetry   |    Cookbooks   |    Food Posters   |    Free Magazines   |    Recipe Contests   |    Gourmet Tours & Schools   |    Key West   |    Food Festivals & Food Shows

Culinary history, food trivia & facts, food quotes, food poems; kitchen tips; who’s who; food events; recipes; trivia quizzes, etc.

 

Return to Newsletter Archive


 




3 Young Chefs at Cooking School

3 Young Chefs

Culinary Arts and
Cooking Schools

From Amateur & Basic Cooking Classes to Professional Chef Training and Degree Programs - you will find them all here!




 

Note: links to other sites in older issues may no longer be valid

*******THE FOOD REFERENCE NEWSLETTER*******
June 22, 2007     Vol 8 #12   ISSN 1535-5659
Food Reference Website - http://www.foodreference.com

TO VIEW THIS NEWSLETTER ONLINE GO TO:
http://www.foodreference.com/html/newsletter.html

*******IN THIS ISSUE*******

   ->  'Food for Thought' by Mark Vogel
   ->  Quotes and Trivia
   ->  Website of the Week
   ->  Food Trivia Quiz
   ->  Readers questions
   ->  Ancient & Classic Recipes
   ->  Did you know?
   ->  Who's Who in the Culinary Arts
   ->  Requested Recipes
   ->  Cooking Tips
   ->  Culinary Calendar - selected events
   ->  How To Subscribe to this Newsletter
   ->  How to Stop receiving this Newsletter
   ->  General information and Copyright


*******FREE FOOD & BEVERAGE PUBLICATIONS*******

Subscriptions to FREE food and Beverage magazines
Food Arts, Seafood Business, Hotel Management Int'l, etc.
Also a selection of other Free Business Magazines
http://www.foodreference.com/html/food-magazines.html


*******'FOOD FOR THOUGHT' BY MARK VOGEL*******

A Good Ribbing
Rib meat is one of the most delectable cuts, irrespective of the quadruped in question.  As usual, there’s a myriad of terms and confusion over what’s what and how to cook it......
http://www.foodreference.com/html/markvogelweeklycolumn.html


*******QUOTE*******

"I don't see why people make such a to-do about choosing a new cook. There is only one thing that is absolutely essential. I always ask at once, 'Do you drink?", and if she says 'No!' I bow politely and say that I am very sorry but I fear that she will not suit.  All good cooks drink."

James S McNeill Whistler quoted in 'Life Was Worth Living' by Graham Robertson.



*******FOOD ART & CULINARY POSTERS*******

The finest selection of food and beverage related posters and art work to be found anywhere. There are thousands of posters - food art, restaurant art, kitchen art, culinary art - food posters, culinary posters, food identification posters, fine art, etc, all suitable for your home, kitchen, restaurant or office.
http://www.culinaryposters.com/



*******TRIVIA*******

Cashews are native to the Americas, but widely cultivated in  India and Africa since the 16th century. You never see cashews for sale in the shell because between the outer and inner shells covering the nut is an extremely caustic oil. The outer shell must be roasted or burned off with the oil (the smoke is also an irritant). The kernels are then boiled or roasted again, and a second shell is removed.



*******THIS WEEK'S WEBSITE OF THE WEEK*******

LE MENAGIER DE PARIS
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/menagier/

"This is an unabridged transcription of the food and cookery chapter of 'Le Ménagier de Paris' (a medieval manuscript dated to circa 1393), edited by Jérome Pichon in 1846 for La Société Des Bibliophiles François.
This is an enormous chapter containing 197 pages of recipes, menus, and general cookery and household instructions (and about 50 pages worth of editorial notes!). There are also several recipes for ink, glue, etc., towards the end of the chapter."


*******CULINARY SCHOOLS, TOURS AND CRUISES*******

Culinary Schools & Cooking Classes - Food and Wine Tours for the amateur & the professional. U.S. and abroad.
The best of the best.
http://www.foodreference.com/html/Cooking-Schools.html



*******FOOD TRIVIA QUIZ*******
The Food Trivia Quizzes are now moved to their own separate section after the newsletter is e-mailed. Check the Navigation Bar at the top of the page.


*******FRESH FLOWERS*******

Fresh Flowers Directly from the Growers
BE TRULY ROMANTIC - GIVE FLOWERS FOR NO REASON AT ALL!
http://www.foodreference.com/html/freshflowers.html


*******FREE TRIAL ISSUE OF SAVEUR MAGAZINE*******

Food Reference subscribers can get a FREE trial issue to Saveur magazine - the award winning magazine that celebrates the people, places and rituals that establish culinary traditions.
https://secure.palmcoastd.com/pcd/document?ikey=089CFHPP1



*******READERS QUESTIONS*******

QUESTION: Many years ago I remember my Grandmother keeping mussels in an enamel bowl and seem to remember her 'feeding' them with oatmeal - have you heard of this practice or was it my imagination?

ANSWER: Fattening oysters and mussels with corn meal is an old practice - it can also help to flush sand and grit from them.  I have also seen references to using oatmeal and even flour.
 
Here are some instructions from various sources.  
TO FATTEN OYSTERS (From Housekeeping in Old Virginia, 1887)
“Mix one pint of salt with thirty pints of water. Put the oysters in a tub that will not leak, with their mouths upwards and feed them with the above, by dipping in a broom and frequently passing over their mouths. It is said that they will fatten still more by mixing fine meal with the water.”
 
Put the mussels in a container with cold water and add 1/2 cup of cornmeal. Let it stand for 1 hour. The mussels will eat the cornmeal and expell any sand or grit. Run them under water again to remove all sand and cornmeal at the end.
 
Eat mussels on the day of purchase whenever possible. If you have to leave them overnight, add some salt to the water. If wished you can add a little flour or oatmeal, too, to feed the mussels so they become plump and white.



*******TRIVIA*******

Celtuce is also known as celery lettuce, asparagus lettuce and stem lettuce. It looks like a cross between celery and lettuce and is actually a lettuce variety.  It is popular in China where it is grown in commercial quantities for its celery like stem.



*******FREE FOOD & BEVERAGE PUBLICATIONS*******

Subscriptions to FREE food and Beverage magazines
Food Arts, Seafood Business, Hotel Management Int'l, etc.
Also a selection of other Free Business Magazines
http://www.foodreference.com/html/food-magazines.html



*******ANCIENT & CLASSIC RECIPES*******

SALAD A LA RUSSE
Fannie Farmer Boston Cooking School Cook Book (1896)

Peel six tomatoes, remove thin slices from top of each, and take out seeds and pulp.

Sprinkle inside with salt, invert, and let stand one-half hour.

Place seeds and pulp removed from tomatoes in a strainer and drain.

Mix one-third cup cucumbers cut in dice, one-third cup cucumbers cut in dice, one-third cup cold cooked peas, one-fourth cup pickles finely chopped, one-third cup tomato pulp, and two tablespoons capers.

Season with salt, pepper, and vinegar.

Put in a cheese cloth and squeeze; then add one-half cup cold cooked chicken cut in very small dice.

Mix with Mayonnaise Dressing, refill tomatoes, sprinkle with finely chopped parsley, and place each on a lettuce leaf.


*******QUOTE*******

"....it is possible to exaggerate and to be duped by gastronomic nincompoops who write of gourmets with a sense of taste so refined that they can tell whether a fish was caught under or between the bridges, and distinguish by its superior flavor the thigh on which the partridge leans while asleep."
Angelo Pellegrini, 'The Unprejudiced Palate' (1948)



*******CATALOGS - CATALOGS - CATALOGS*******

Order the world’s best and most unique Catalogs!
Plus save money with exclusive Savings Certificates from every catalog. Voted the #1 source for catalog shopping!
http://www.foodreference.com/html/freecatalogs.html



*******DID YOU KNOW?*******

Cheese rennet is an herb in the coffee family, also called lady's bedstraw and yellow bedstraw. It contains a milk curdling enzyme, and the name cheese rennet comes from its ability to curdle milk for cheese making. The leaves and stems also yield a yellow dye which was used to color cheese and butter. The name lady's bedstraw relates to its use as a mattress stuffing.



*******WHO'S WHO IN THE CULINARY ARTS*******

Uncle Ben (20th century)
   According to the company, Uncle Ben was an African American Texas rice grower, who had a reputation for the quality of his harvested rice. Supposedly his rice became the standard by which all other rice was judged.
   During WW II, Gordon L. Harwell's company, Converted Rice, Inc., supplied high quality rice to the U.S. Armed Forces. After the war, the company began offering the same high quality rice to consumers, and named it ‘Uncle Ben's’ after the Texas rice grower.



*******CULINARY SCHOOLS, TOURS AND CRUISES*******

Culinary Schools & Cooking Classes - Food and Wine Tours for the amateur & the professional. U.S. and abroad.
The best of the best.
http://www.foodreference.com/html/Cooking-Schools.html



*******QUOTE*******

"....what is your host's purpose in having a party?  Surely not for you to enjoy yourself; if that were their sole purpose they'd have simply sent champagne and women over to your place by taxi."
P. J. O'Rourke (1947 - )


*******RECIPE REQUESTS FROM READERS*******

Lamb Stew
http://www.foodreference.com/html/irish-lamb-stew.html
http://www.foodreference.com/html/irish-lamb-stew2.html
http://www.foodreference.com/html/lamb-stew.html
http://www.foodreference.com/html/lamb-stew-rice.html


 Email your recipe requests, food info or history
 questions to me at [email protected]



*******FOOD ART AND FOOD POSTERS*******

The finest selection of food and beverage related posters and art work to be found anywhere. There are thousands of posters - food art, restaurant art, kitchen art, culinary art - food posters, culinary posters, food identification posters, fine art, etc, all suitable for your home, kitchen, restaurant or office.
http://www.culinaryposters.com/



*******COOKING TIPS*******

When whipping cream the cream should be as cold as possible, and the bowl should also be very cold. The cream will whip easier and to a higher volume when very cold. (a very slight pinch of salt added at the beginning also helps the cream to whip). When the cream is about 1/2 whipped, add the sugar and vanilla and continue to whip.  If you add the sugar and vanilla at the beginning, the cream will not whip to high volume.
1 cup heavy cream
small pinch of salt
1 to 2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla


*******CULINARY CALENDAR - A FEW SELECTED EVENTS*******

FRIDAY, JUNE 22
1992 M.F.K. Fisher (Mary Frances Kennedy Fisher) died. Fisher was an American food critic and writer, author of various articles, essays and books about food, and she also translated Brillat-Savarin's 'The Physiology of Taste' in 1949.

SATURDAY, JUNE 23
1626 A large Codfish, split open at a Cambridge market, was found to contain a copy of a book of religious treatises by John Frith.

SUNDAY, JUNE 24
1895 Jack Dempsey was born. He is regarded as one of the greatest boxers of all time. He held the world heavyweight title from 1919 to 1926. He then became a successful restaurateur in New York City.

MONDAY, JUNE 25
1951 Pabst aired the 1st color beer commercial on TV

TUESDAY, JUNE 26
1981 In Mountain Home, Idaho, Virginia Campbell took her coupons and rebates and bought $26,460 worth of groceries. She only paid 67 cents after all the discounts

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27
1615 The first tea was imported to the west

THURSDAY, JUNE 28
1997 Boxer Mike Tyson bites a big chunk off Evander Holyfield's ear in the 3rd round of a boxing match. He was disqualified. Snacking is only allowed between rounds.


For a complete listing of each day's events, go here:
http://www.foodreference.com/html/HistoricEvents.html



*******FOOD & WINE MAGAZINES & CATALOGS*******

Hundreds of Food, Recipe, Wine and Beer Magazines at great discount prices.  Also Health & Fitness, Home & Gardening, Hunting & Fishing, Environmental, Travel, Nature, Recreation etc. Magazines - and more!
http://www.foodreference.com/html/food-magazines.html



*******TRIVIA*******

Chess pie was popular in colonial America, and is still popular in the southern U.S.  It is a pie with a simple filling of eggs, butter, sugar and lemon juice (and sometimes a small amount of flour). The name could be a corruption of 'cheese pie' (the custard could seem to be cheese). There are similar cheese-less cheese cake recipes.



*******QUOTE*******

"A cheese may disappoint. It may be dull, it may be naive, it may be oversophisticated. Yet it remains, cheese, milk's leap toward immortality."
Clifton Fadiman, 'Any Number Can Play' (1957)



*******PLEASE RATE THIS EZINE AT THE EZINE FINDER*******

http://www.ezinefinder.com/foodre-vote.html
You can vote once each day. Your votes are appreciated.



*******OTHER GREAT E-MAIL NEWSLETTERS*******

Beer Basics - http://www.beerbasics.com
Ardent Spirits - http://www.ardentspirits.com


*******MAILING LIST INFORMATION*******

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE OR REMOVE YOURSELF FROM THIS NEWSLETTER LIST

To SUBSCRIBE to this newsletter, send an email with SUBSCRIBE in the Subject Line to: [email protected]

NOTE: The newsletter is sent from [email protected]  or [email protected] Please add them to your approved senders list if you use a spam filtering program.

To STOP receiving this newsletter send an email with REMOVE in the Subject Line to: [email protected]


*******PUBLISHER INFORMATION*******

Food Reference Newsletter  ISSN 1535-5659
James T Ehler (Exec. Chef, Editor & Publisher)
166 W. Broadway
Suite 315
Winona, Minnesota 55987-6259
E-mail: [email protected]    Phone: (507) 474-1689
Food Reference WebSite: http://www.foodreference.com

******* © Copyright 1990-2007 James T Ehler. All rights reserved. You may copy and use portions of this newsletter for noncommercial, personal use only. You may forward a copy to someone else as long as the Copyright notice is included. Any other use of the materials in this newsletter without prior written permission is prohibited.

 

Home     |     About Us & Contact Info     |     Food Trivia Quizzes     |     Other Food Links

Please feel free to link to any pages of FoodReference.com from your website.

For permission to use any of this content please E-mail: [email protected]

All contents are copyright © 1990 - 2012 James T. Ehler and www.FoodReference.com unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved.     You may copy and use portions of this website for non-commercial, personal use only.
Any other use of these materials without prior written authorization is not very nice and violates the copyright.

Please take the time to request permission.
 





 

 

 

Food Videos

FOOD VIDEO SECTION

Recipe Videos, BBQ & Grilling, Food Safety, Food Science, Beverages, Festivals, Vintage Commercials, etc.

 

 

Click here to buy posters at Allposters!
Click here to buy posters at Allposters!