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Fresh horseradish should be stored at 35 degrees F.

1 Tablespoon fresh grated horseradish equals - 
2 Tablespoons bottled horseradish

horseradishThe bite and aroma of the horseradish root are almost absent until it is grated or ground. During this process, as the root cells are crushed, volatile oils known as isothiocyanate are released. Vinegar stops this reaction and stabilizes the flavor. For milder horseradish, vinegar is added immediately.

     To relish the full flavor of processed horseradish, it must be fresh and of high quality. Color varies from white to creamy beige. As processed horseradish ages, it browns and loses potency. Replace with a fresh jar for full flavor enjoyment.

     Varieties of prepared horseradish include Cream Style Prepared Horseradish, Horseradish Sauce, Beet Horseradish and Dehydrated Horseradish. Distinguishing characteristics may be ingredients or texture -- fine or coarse ground. The true horseradish enthusiast has several favorites, depending on the end use.

     Cocktail sauce with prepared horseradish is another winner, and has many uses beyond its usual role, as a flavorful accompaniment for seafood.

     Mustard with prepared horseradish also adds a rich and spicy zing to cold cuts or hot entrees.

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